Kraków for a Secular Europe

“Secularism and Tolerance” will be the motto of the 2013 edition of the Festival of Secularism that will take place in Cracow, September 20-22.

March & Rally – Saturday 21st September 2013

Start 13:30, location: Smocza Jama, Bulwar Czerwienski

Meeting point: the Dragon figure by the Wawel Castle.

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/414946835283494/

 

Festival of Secularism

Come join us in the following events:

Friday, 20 September

5:00 p.m. “Church of dubious virtue”: Agnieszka Zakrzewicz, Malgorzata Winiarczyk-Kossakowska & Ekke Overbeek discuss the books Lekajcie sie (Verily, Fear Thee: Testimonies of the Victims of Paedophilia in Polish Church) and Glosy spoza choru (Voices from beyond the Choir).

Venue: Malopolski Ogrod Sztuki,  Rajska Street 12

7:30 p.m. Vernissage for the exhibition of artwork by Jan Koza, a satirical cartoonist publishing in the “Polityka” weekly magazine.
Venue: Malopolski Ogrod Sztuki,  Rajska Street 12

Saturday, 21 September

11 a.m. “Religious symbols in the public sphere” (workshop)
Venue: Klub Pod Jaszczurami, Main Square 8

1:30 p.m. March for Secularism.

Meeting point: the Dragon figure by the Wawel Castle. More info at: https://www.facebook.com/events/414946835283494/

5 p.m. “How NOT to finance churches”. A debate. Guests: Wanda Nowicka, Joanna Senyszyn.
Venue: Klub Pod Jaszczurami, Main Square 8

Sunday, September 22

12:00 a.m. “Political transformation at the expense of women’s rights.” A debate. Guests: Anna Dryjanska, Monika Platek, Wanda Nowicka, Agata Czarnacka and Agnieszka Ziolkowska.

Venue: Jewish Community Centre,  Miodowa Street 24

4:00 p.m. “How to quit your church for good.” A discussion.
Venue: Jewish Community Centre,  Miodowa Street 24

If you wish to help us organize or finance the Festival of Secularism, email us at: kontakt@kpis.pl

Organizers: Koalicja Postep i Swieckosc  (the Progress and Secularism Coalition)

 

 

 

Manifesto

We are humanists who yearn for peaceful coexistence of different beliefs and world-views. We believe that such a subjective notion as faith should not be a weapon of political wrangling and a means of exerting pressure on secular legislation. We agree that everyone ought to have the freedom and right to their own religion and belief as long as it does not endanger others.

Secular state is not a made up “privilege” of atheists and agnostics. It is the principle of a free civil society, guaranteed by the constitution, which provides the freedom to profess any religion or no religion at all. We do not agree to disregard or even denial of the provisions of the Constitution on the separation of church and state. We expect equal rights and equal treatment of believers and non-believers.

We are strongly opposed to giving away public assets to win favor with the clergy, doing politics in the church, blackmailing the legislative power with excommunications on matters related to abortions and in vitro. We are protesting against any attempts  of public slander of people holding views which are different from religious orthodoxy. Strong suppression of any voices of criticism over Catholic church contradicts the basic rules of democracy. We demand immediate squaring and explanation of crime-related activities of the Property Commission. We support the attempts to remove art. 196 of the penal code about the offending of religious feelings, which effectively clogs the mouths of  those (especially artists) who dare to criticize Catholic church. We do not agree to censorship of any kind, and we believe in freedom of research and creativity.

We demand the exclusion of religion from the public school curriculum as well as the mark from this subject from the school certificate. We demand the public space to be free of religious symbolism and to cease the practice of official participation of  key government officials in masses celebrated on national holidays and other important anniversaries.

We demand the total cessation of subsidizing the church from the state budget. We consider it acceptable to introduce church tax, which does not only enable the practitioners of a given religion to support their own churches, but will also help to verify the number practitioners in a credible way.

Poland is a country in which even some Catholics are against the church interference in not only public but also their private lives and the lives of people of other faiths and non-believes. They want to be allowed to run their own lives. Let the state be secular, and people happy, each in its own way.

 

 

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